Giveaway: Elements of Mathematics: From Euclid to Gödel

This week we’re giving away a hardcover copy of Elements of Mathematics: From Euclid to Gödel. To enter Math Blog’s August giveaway, please follow the instructions below.

PRIZE DETAILS

Elements of Mathematics: From Euclid to Gödel by John Stillwell is a great dim sum, so to speak, of various mathematical areas. The topics covered are “elementary” and the clear explanations, as per the author’s admission, don’t assume mathematical knowledge beyond a high school level.

Presented this way, the book would appear to be quite basic. In reality, I would expect most undergraduate students to be challenged at times while reading it.

I’ll go further and say that despite being an extremely approachable book, I’m willing to wager that even most mathematicians would walk away from this book with some new insight on these “elementary” topics.

The discussion around what makes a mathematical concept elementary or advanced (through the filter of infinity, abstraction, and proof) alone is worth the price of admission.

For the record, the book is divided into 10 chapters: a brief introduction to 8 areas of math, followed by 8 chapters each of which explores one of them, and wraps up with an advanced mathematics chapter.

  1. Elementary Topics
  2. Arithmetic
  3. Computation
  4. Algebra
  5. Geometry
  6. Calculus
  7. Combinatorics
  8. Probability
  9. Logic
  10. Some Advanced Mathematics

Each chapter concludes with a few pages of historical and philosophical remarks. Really good stuff.

I enjoyed this book and I’m excited to giveaway a copy to one lucky reader. See below for details on how to enter the giveaway.

GIVEAWAY DETAILS

We are using the Rafflecopter widget below. If you participated in our raffles before, you can skip the instructions and go straight for the widget.

The widget will ask you to log in by providing your name and email (or through Facebook).

Once you’ve logged in, you’ll be asked to subscribe to our mailing list. You’ll be able to do so by simply clicking the checkmark, which you can also click if you are a subscriber already. This action will enter you in the giveaway and give you 5 virtual raffle tickets. After the giveaway, if you dislike our post updates, you can unsubscribe at any time. We obviously care about our readers and would never spam you.

OK, you claimed your 5 points by subscribing and with them, you entered the giveaway. At this point, you’ll have the opportunity to gain up to 16 additional entries in the giveaway by completing other tasks. Namely, these are:

  • Leaving a specific comment (read the instructions in the widget) (+5 entries)
  • Tweeting about the giveaway (+3 entries)
  • Sharing on Facebook (+3 entries)
  • Following Princeton University Press on Twitter (+2 entries)
  • Following my twitter account (+2 entries)
  • Checking out Amazon’s review(s) for this book (+1 entry)

If you already subscribe or follow, you can claim the relevant entries. Note that all of these additional tasks are optional. Though they can help your odds and they don’t take much time to complete.

At the end of Wednesday, August 24, 2016 (at midnight PST, so technically August 25th), the giveaway closes and a winner will be selected randomly from all the entries. The more entries you have out of the possible 21 entries, the greater your odds.

The widget will show you how many entries you have claimed and how many entries there are in total, as shown in the sample image below.

Raffle explained

The winner will be contacted within 48 hours by email, and arrangements will be made to ship the book to the winner’s physical address. Please note that in order to avoid unfair entries, the randomly selected winner’s entries will be verified to confirm that the actions were actually taken. If not, then a new random draw will be executed.

Best of luck!

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13 Comments

  1. Blaine Dowler August 18, 2016
  2. Tim Holzschuh August 18, 2016
  3. tom August 18, 2016
  4. Alan Tam August 18, 2016
  5. Tim Corica August 18, 2016
  6. Denise Gaskins August 18, 2016
  7. Cheryl Hughes August 18, 2016
  8. Sayth Renshaw August 19, 2016
  9. Anshid Aboobacker August 19, 2016
  10. shubham sharma August 19, 2016
  11. Edward Lesmes August 20, 2016
  12. Jim Wysocki August 22, 2016
  13. William Sked August 24, 2016

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